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Episode 212: Manage Your Blog Metrics in a Single Spot with Otherboard with Justin Sainton

In episode 212, we talk with Justin Sainton, found of Other Board, about tracking metrics from all different platforms in one place that’s easy to use on WordPress.

We cover why Other Board can help you connect multiple platforms and glean insights from them easily, track your WordPress content in the same place you see Google analytics, console and Facebook and Slickstream!

Listen on the player below or on iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast player. Or scroll down to read a full transcript.


Guest Details

Connect with Otherboard
Website | Facebook

Bio Justin is the creator of Otherboard, a content management system for WordPress site owners, which launched in 2021. He also started Zao, a WordPress Agency, in 2005. Justin uses his freetime to beat his 5 kids at video games, cooking giant quantities of bacon and French toast on his Blackstone, helping make WordPress awesome, being on call for clients 24/7 and with his amazing wife who is by far his better half, Melissa. Justin is also a big fan of Doordash and dad jokes!

Takeaways

  • Other Board brings together data from multiple platforms in an automated and meaningful way.
  • Manually entering information into another system can leave you error prone, so Other Board automates it for you so it’s easy, fast and accurate.
  • Other Board is not a plugin. It takes minutes to login and set up.
  • You can plan the phases of a WP post and share that planning with your team so you know who’s doing what and when it’s complete in 1 place.
  • Other Board is accepting people to be part of the beta testing. This will help Other Board ensure that they user experience is functional for people who are not tech savvy but need to run their business with success.

Transcript

Click for full text.

Intro:

Welcome to Eat Blog Talk, where food bloggers come to get their fill of the latest tips, tricks, and insights into the world of food blogging. If you feel that hunger for information, we’ll provide you with the tools you need to add value to your blog. And we’ll also ensure you’re taking care of yourself, because food blogging is a demanding job. Now, please welcome your host, Megan Porta.

Megan Porta:

Hey, awesome food bloggers. Do you struggle with knowing exactly what you should be doing to move the needle forward in your business? Do you struggle with knowing what to focus on next? If so, if this sounds like you, I have two solutions for you. Number one is mastermind groups. There is so much power in getting people together and helping to solve each other’s problems. At Eat Blog Talk we have put together our own mastermind groups and we are hosting these weekly. You can join at any time. You can try it out for a month or you can sign up for a quarter or you can go all in and sign up for an entire year. Come join us. See if it’s a great fit for you. This will really help you to solve those problems you’re having in your business and give you clarity about what you should be doing next to move your business forward.

The next solution is the Eat Blog Talk membership. I have spent all of 2021 so far putting so much value inside of the membership. It is such a supportive and wonderful place to be for food bloggers. We are learning so much from each other. We are joining together in monthly intensive calls, where we focus on very specific parts of food blogging in order to grow our businesses in massive ways. We also have guest experts come in and join us very regularly to talk about really specific parts of food blogging. We get one-on-one access to these experts such as Matt Molen from email crush, Casey Markee from Media Wyse. So many great people are joining us in these sessions and they are super valuable. There are so many reasons why you should be in the membership. I could not even start touching on all of it. If you’re tired of wandering around aimlessly in your business and not knowing what to focus on, give the membership a try for free for two weeks. Go to eatblogtalk.com. You can sign up for the masterminds there, and you can also start the process of getting into the membership for two weeks, just to check it out. The rest of us can’t wait to see you inside.

What’s up, food bloggers. Welcome to Eat Blog Talk. This podcast is for you, food bloggers wanting value and clarity to help you find greater success in your business. I have Justin Sainton with me today from otherboard.com and we’re going to chat about Other Board and how you can get help with analytics by using otherboard. Justin is the creator of Other Board, a content management system for WordPress site owners, which launched in 2021. He also started Zau, a WordPress agency in 2005. Justin uses his free time to beat his five kids at video games, cooking giant quantities of bacon and French toast on his Blackstone, helping make WordPress awesome. Being on call for clients twenty four seven, all with his amazing wife who is by far his better half, Melissa. Justin is also a big fan of DoorDash and dad jokes. Okay. Before I even get to your fun fact, Justin, I have to ask what is your best dad joke? What is your favorite video game to play with your kids?

Justin Sainton:

Oh my goodness. Put me on the spot. Okay. So funny fact about dad jokes. I love them so much that our wifi password at my home is actually a lame dad joke. So now everybody’s going to know our wifi password if you come over. But our wifi password is, my friend David lost his ID in Prague. That’s the whole password. Then the punchline, which is not part of the password is now we just call him Dav, because he lost his ID. I have to explain it to most people. So it can’t be that funny, but it’s one of my favorites.

Megan:

Okay. That is perfect. Favorite video game to play with your kids.

Justin:

Oh man, boy, there’s a few. They love playing animal crossing, which I had never heard of until a few friends of mine told me about it, but the kids are obsessed with it. I can’t get into it really, but my wife loves it. The one that I loved playing with them and beating them at, okay, well two. So the first one is Just Dance, which if you’ve never played Just Dance, it’s just a game that you play, and you dance to music or whatever, that’s basically it. But it is so much fun and you sweat like crazy and you realize how out of shape or not you are. Then the other one that I love because it just brings me back to my childhood, is playing Mario Kart on the Nintendo Switch. It’s so much fun.

Megan:

I love Mario. Were you a Nintendo fan of Mario brothers?

Justin:

Totally. That was my jam.

Megan:

Me too. My mom always tells a story, my best friend and I played that so much that in the middle of the night, she would actually wake up and hear the music like dah, dah, dah, duh dah done. So she would come into my room and be like, turn off Super Mario brothers and we were sound asleep. I was like, mom, you’re hearing it in your sleep. So that’s pretty bad.

Justin:

That’s a lot.

Megan:

It’s a lot of music that was probably floating around our house. So fun. On top of that, do you have an additional fun fact? I feel like that was 10 fun facts in one.

Justin:

Oh man. So many fun facts. So here’s my fun fact for the day. When I was growing up, I had the opportunity. It didn’t feel like an opportunity at the time, but it was to move with my twin brother when we were 14 years old to China for a year. So between 14 and 15, I lived in China for a year with my brother in a small, relatively small town. It only had a million people, and so it felt small relative to many other towns in China. But we were some of the only English speakers in the town. So that was how I spent my freshman year of high school really in China, in a little town called Sangin. It wasn’t fun at the time, but man I’m so thankful for it now.

Megan:

Isn’t that funny? How you look back and you’re like, I was so mad about X, but now I’m so grateful for X. Did you learn Chinese? You had to have been one of the only English speakers.

Justin:

Just, just enough. There were always those people who were learning English, who had come up to us and wanted to practice their English. So we would learn little bits of Mandarin. Mostly we didn’t learn a ton of Cantonese and really just enough to go to the restaurants and order the food that we liked. There was a little restaurant down the street from our apartment where we would order chocolate waffles and orange juice almost every morning. So I can’t remember a ton, but I can remember how to haggle, how to get a taxi, how to order chocolate waffles. Really valuable things.

Megan:

The important things, right? Chocolate and sugar to start your day.

Justin:

You’re 14 years old. I mean, what else do you need?

Megan:

Absolutely. I have a 14 year old in my house and that’s all he wants is sugary breakfasts. I put this note on our fridge every morning for the past week or two, because he’ll sneak into the fridge and eat all of the garbage before we’re even awake. So I have this note that says no sneaking food and he will crumple it up and get rid of it before I even wake up. So it doesn’t really work.

Justin:

I was going to ask how effective it was.

Megan:

Not at all, but I thought I’d at least give it a try. Oh, well this has been fun. Now we need to talk about the reason you’re here, Justin, which is Other Board. I’m so excited about Other Board. I was in a clubhouse the other day and a fellow food blogger mentioned what we were talking about. Content planning and all of the analytics we have to track and using Air Table to track all of our blog posts. She came on stage and she was like, you guys, there’s something coming that you just have to hold out for. The rest of us were super intrigued. Then I think it was two weeks later, you actually popped into the room. I think you were like running after your kids or something and you’re out of breath and you’re like, hi, I’m so glad I caught you guys. But you were able to explain a little bit about the Other Board and piqued our interest. So I’m super excited to have this conversation. We want to hear all about it. You’ve talked about Other Board solving an exact pain point for content creators and food bloggers. So would you mind Justin, just telling us what that pain point is and how you think food bloggers will benefit from Other Board?

Justin:

Absolutely. You really alluded to it a little bit already, and we’ve been working with food bloggers and content publishers for a long time. We started our agency back in 2005. So we’ve been kind of in this space for a long time and the pain points that keep on coming up over and over and over, especially with folks who aren’t necessarily hobbyists, but those who are really running businesses where their blog and their livelihoods are centered around that content, the pain points that come up over and over and have for the last 15 plus years is that there are just so many things to track, that it can really kind of be overwhelming. So if you do get to the point as a business owner where you’re tracking the things that you know you should track, there’s a million different systems to do it.

It might just be a spreadsheet or it might be Air Table or a sauna or Trello or a million different things. They all work in some nice ways and they all don’t work in other ways. A lot of the more modern tools like your click ups and your Air Tables and things like that are made and, and rightly so, to solve a hundred thousand different problems for a hundred thousand different kinds of people. But there was nothing really built specifically for content publishers, specifically for bloggers and food bloggers and folks like that that would really do exactly what people need it to do. So a lot of times, a lot of our clients who have worked with things like Air Table, they’ll say, Hey, it’s really powerful. It’s really cool. But man, connecting to WordPress, I have to use Zapier or Zapier depending on how you pronounce it.

I have to do all these integrations and then that costs more money. Then it doesn’t work all the time. If I don’t do that, it’s a really manual process. It’s error prone, or I have to pay my VA to do it or whatever. So that’s a bummer. Then not only do they have to bring their content in and through those either kind of manual error prone, or expensive ways, they then have to bring in all these other content pieces in, right? So you have your ad revenue RPMs, you have your social stats, you have your analytics, you have all these different data points, right? So really bringing them together in an automated and meaningful way that doesn’t just splash data in front of you. Cause a lot of folks now have grown their businesses to the point where they may have developers contracted or even on staff, that can build a spreadsheet or that can build a report or something like that.

Even those, and that’s really the higher end of a lot of the folks we’re serving, even then, it’s just kind of showing you data. It’s not really telling you about it. It’s not really a good tool for your business. So that’s why even on the Other Board homepage, we have this whole section that kind of says, there’s this quick connection auto population and brilliant insights because those are the pain points that we’ve really noticed with folks that we serve. It can take forever, or it can be error prone, or just really manual to get connected with your site, to get connected with WordPress and really bring all the data and all the content in. Then to populate it is again a very manual process and potentially error prone, and then to actually get insights from it, again, very manual and even difficult to know what insights are actionable or which ones are high priority and which ones are low priority. That type of thing. The whole aim with Other Board and I won’t spend a whole lot of time on boring technical details cause that’s probably the only fascinating thing to boring technical people like me. But the whole point of Other Board is to do all of this in an automated way that stays in sync with your site at all times and connects to all these different data points that matter most to food bloggers and to content publishers.

Megan:

Wow. That sounds like a dream. So what exactly gets tracked and is this a plugin that goes inside of WordPress?

Justin:

Really good questions. So let me start with the last one, because it’s a shorter answer. Is it a plugin that goes inside of WordPress? No, it’s not. We’ve seen over the years, a lot of our clients have used different tools that have kind of scratched the surface of this problem, like CoSchedule or Edit Flow, or I think Published Press. There’s a bunch of WordPress plugins that get mangled together to try to kind of solve this and live inside somebody’s WordPress dashboard. For us we felt like that was not the right approach to solving this. Just building a tool like this and I’m a big believer in WordPress and it’s how I’ve been paying my bills for the last 15 years. I really, really like it. It’s just not really the right tool for this job.

So it’s not a plugin that lives inside WordPress. That said it may eventually have some small companion plugin if we need to do some technical things to extend how WordPress works, but no, it’s not a plug-in that lives inside of WordPress. You’ll go to otherboard.com, you’ll log in and then boom, you’ll have your own kind of Other Board instance there for you. But what gets tracked? That’s a super good question. The list of things that we track is endless and I expect that it will be growing for probably years to come. So the biggest thing that we track right now is obviously everything inside WordPress, all of your content, your tags and categories and even other things that we make them available to folks, that a lot of content publishers use like Yoast SEO and things like that.

So if you’re using that, we make a lot of that data available to you within Other Board. So all of your content and all of your tags and categories and SEO data gets pulled into Other Board and stays in sync in real time. That’s super fun. A lot of other things that we track too, would include things like of course your search analytics for your site, most folks use Google analytics. So that’s the first one that we’re starting with. But there’s other analytics packages that are getting more and more popular. Some that really focus on privacy and things like that. So we’re looking into different analytics packages like that in the future, but Google of course is the big one. The next Google area that we integrate with is Google search console. Lots of content publishers use search consoles to track lots of stuff these days. Their web vitals, they just came out with their page user experience report. Then of course rankings and results, placements and things like that. So we track all of that. We’re also, I think I mentioned this, I don’t remember if it was on Clubhouse or not. But somebody was asking me a question about what’s the most surprising thing that has taken the longest to build that you weren’t expecting when you first started this. Without a doubt, everybody who uses SEMrush for tracking keywords and things like that. In talking to a lot of our clients, a lot of them said, you know, we really like SEMrush and it can do a bunch of things.

But I only use it for X and Y and Z. So I started to wonder, man, what if we could pull some of that into Other Board either so that it would work nicely with SEMrush as an integration, which spoiler alert, it doesn’t. SEMrush doesn’t like what we’re doing, which is fine, whatever. But I started to wonder, man, is there a tool that could do it? We looked across a bunch of a million different ones and it turns out Google ads, like with our ads dashboard, which most food bloggers don’t run Google ads, but Google ads has an ad dashboard that lets you do things like keyword research and traffic estimation and really powerful things, a lot of the same things that SEMrush does. We started talking to the folks over at the Google ads API compliance team or whatever and saying, Hey, we want to build this tool.

Can we build it? They said, no. We said, why? So we started that conversation with them and they said, well, if you want to build this tool, you have to build it in such a way that it works with everything Google ads does, not just these three or four pain points you’re trying to solve. Actually what we’ve done is, we’ve sort of built a tool that does exactly that. That allows people who do use Google ads a lot, which is not our audience at all. But folks who do, this would be like SEO agencies and people like that. We’ve built out an entire dashboard and it probably increased our development time by like 500% across what we originally imagined. But the effort behind all of that was so that we could expose these highly valuable keyword research tools within Other Board to content publishers, which for a lot of them matters a whole lot.

Having that type of information in one space, in the context of your content and the rest of your data, can be so helpful and so powerful. So all of that is a really long-winded way of answering, one of the things that we’re tracking is some of the keyword impressions and positions, and even keyword research within that type of context of your content. Then of course all the social things. So the big ones would be like Facebook and Instagram and YouTube. Some less popular ones, but still kind of trending high would be like Slick Stream, a lot of bloggers these days use Slick Stream. So we have an integration with them as well. The last one that we are that we’re working real hard on but not getting too far with, and I mentioned this in our Facebook live a couple of weeks ago, is Pinterest.

Pinterest is kind of a close to garden as far as integrations go right now. But Pinterest of course, everybody knows matters a whole lot for bloggers and content publishers. So we have some what I would call second class integrations with Pinterest, where we try to get some counts and repins and things like that from different services. But eventually as they open up a little more, we’re going to want to integrate more tightly with them as well. So those are like the big things that we’re tracking. Within each of those, of course there’s a lot of subsets. So even just within Facebook or Instagram, if you’re somebody who gets a lot of your traffic from Instagram or we’re tracking your stories and we’re tracking comments on your posts, and we’re kind of behind the scenes, we’re connecting your posts on Instagram and your stories on Instagram to the actual blog posts that we can tie all that together.

Facebook is the same way. Maybe you share a recipe 10 times to your page over the course of six months, we’re tracking all of those shares, tying them to the WordPress post, determining which ones went the most viral or which ones got shared the most. Maybe even the ones that had the most people thumbs down or have a negative reaction or unfollow your page, so that you can understand, Hey, the way we shared this or the timing that we shared this was less effective or had a negative impact compared to the time that we shared it this way. So all of these different types of integrations have a lot of different data points within them and a lot of insights that can come alongside them.

Megan:

Oh my gosh, I can see where this is going to be so beneficial. Just the insight portion that you talked about, and it’s so robust as you were talking, I was like, well, he can’t have anything else. You mentioned social platforms and Pinterest, this sounds so amazing. Do you have anything inside that helps with content management?

Justin:

Yeah. So that’s a really good question. So in terms of content management, I would say content management is one of those funny things that can mean very different things to different people. A lot of folks, and we even do this because of how other folks talk about it, have referred to Other Board as a content management system. Then as somebody who comes from a development background and a WordPress background, I hear about the content management system and I think, oh, well, that’s WordPress. So to answer that question, I would just ask another question of when you say content management, what does that mean to you?

Megan:

I think to most food bloggers, content management would be the posts that we plan or the recipe posts that we plan to put on our blog. Because, just as an example, I currently use Air Table, previously used Trello, and we need somewhere to put all of the content that we put up and also the status of each content. The date, maybe like Pinterest pins associated with it, et cetera. So Air Table holds all of that information for me and it’s fine. But like you said earlier, it’s another separate platform. I don’t use Air Table for anything else. It’s just my content management. So that’s kind of what content management means to me.

Justin:

Yeah. So we do have a lot of plans for that. Sometimes when people ask us about content management they’re asking, Hey, within Other Board, are you going to have the same editor for the content that you have within WordPress? Whether that’s the classic editor, whether it has a block editor, we’re not going that direction for a lot of reasons that we don’t really have to get into, but mostly because oftentimes that’s not really optimal. But we do have content management within Other Board, in the sense of on the post page. Maybe you’ve drafted a post or scheduled a post for three or four months down the road. You have that in WordPress already, that scheduled or drafted posts will also appear in Other Board. You can manage a lot of that post, not so much the content, but the data around the content. The metadata, the tags, the images, the scheduling, you can see for published posts the comments and the reviews that you’ve been given.

Things like that you can even within each post, you can create a template for your team or your VA. A lot of folks are just one person bloggers, but a lot of folks these days have VA’s and photographers and writers even, and all sorts of people on their teams that help them out and stuff. You can create for every post, whether it’s drafted. Really a phase of that post, it’s different from the WordPress status. So WordPress status is, of course you can publish your schedule or draft or have it pending or whatever, but that doesn’t necessarily give you the information to know Hey, this person has written this post, but has this person edited it and has this person done the photography and has this person prepared the social and all of those things. So within the Other Board for each post, you do have that ability to plan the phases of each post and to assign each phase to somebody on your team. When somebody marks their phase as, Hey, I took the photos, Hey, I edited the content, they check the box and then the next person in the phase gets notified that it’s ready for them. So in terms of managing content and editorial workflow and things like that, Other Board makes all of that possible.

Megan:

Cool. That answers that. So I have another question about just overall ease of use, because that was one of my main issues. I think this is a common theme with food bloggers with SEMrush: you go into SEMrush and okay, I am not technically minded. I have no idea what’s going on here. You can have someone teach you, but still, you don’t really think that way, the way it’s set up. So how easy is Other Board to use?

Justin:

Totally. That’s such a good question. Because I mean, it’s true of SEMrush, but it’s also true of a lot of things. Is that most tools like this are built by developers and developers are not really well known for creating really nice to use user experiences. Which is why I have not been the one responsible for any of the user experience, because that is not my playground. It’s not my ballpark. So we’ve worked with really amazing user experience designers. We’ve worked with our small alpha group of food blogger testers to give us a lot of feedback, not even on the app itself as the app itself isn’t quite there for beta, but even just to give us insight and feedback on the designs, on the mock-ups on the user experience so that we know for sure that whether we’re designers or developers, we’re not designing or developing for ourselves, we’re designing and developing for our audience. So we’ve included really key people, even just clients of ours that we’ve worked with in the past, kind of in the entire process so that we know that what we’re building serves them well. So for those reasons, not because I’m such a great designer or developer or anything like that, although I’m all right in terms of development, otherwise I wouldn’t be building this. But we’ve really integrated user feedback from the very beginning. So I think the ease of use will be really, really delightful.

Megan:

That is so smart. I feel like I kind of manifested you because two years ago, I was like, why has nobody done this? All of these platforms are so ridiculously hard to understand for people like me. I have no technical background. I’m creative, I think very visually. So there needs to be somebody who takes the user experience perspective and puts a tool together for us. So, Justin, I think I manifested you.

Justin:

Thank you for manifesting me. My wife and my kids appreciate it. Ohhh.

Megan:

It’s not just me. I think collectively food bloggers have always wanted something like this.

Justin:

I mean like, yes, yes, yes. You’re so right. It’s not just SEMrush, but even if I, as someone who is pretty technically inclined, when I log into ad dashboards, whether it’s Ad Thrive or Mediavine, or anything else in analytics dashboards like Google analytics, for me, who is fairly technically inclined, it’s overwhelming. So for folks who are not technically inclined, which covers a lot of food bloggers, I don’t know how most people do it, honestly. It’s overwhelming.

Megan:

It is. It’s almost to the point of wanting to just leave again. I did that with SEMrush for the first handful of times I went in. I literally like went in and I was like, I have no idea what this means. I’m leaving. My brain couldn’t handle it. I don’t think this way, this is weird. So it took some encouragement from other people; yes, it’s really robust. There’s great information. You’ve got to try again. Finally I just forced myself to do it, but we shouldn’t have to force ourselves to go learn a tool. It should be easy to use. So thank you in advance.

Justin:

You’re welcome. Well, it should be easy. It should be delightful. It should feel fun. You should log into it and just feel happy when you see it. If there’s something to not feel happy about, I can’t tell you how, like that quote in the bio about being on call 24/7. I can’t tell you how many calls we’ve had from our clients who are O M G my SEMrush number went up or down or whatever. My Google traffic got cut in half or this post isn’t performing as well or whatever. There’s real concerns that affect real people that can happen in analytics, and you want to be able to log in to Other Board to whatever, and usually feel happy. But if there’s something that you need to know, like right now and know how to act on it right now, your tool should tell you that too.

Megan:

Yes, definitely. How extensive is the setup? How long does it take someone to get set up with all of their accounts on Other Board?

Justin:

Such a good question. So the main thing that everybody will have to do no matter what, is connected with their WordPress site. So that takes I would say maybe 20 seconds. There’s no plug-in to install. There’s nothing fancy to do. Assuming you’re already logged in to WordPress, you’ll log into Other Board. You’ll click authenticate with WordPress. Then it’ll take you straight to your WordPress site. You’ll click authorize, it’ll take you right back. That’s the extent of connecting with WordPress and that’s all that you have to do to import all of your content in all of your tags and categories, everything that you need to do. It’s just that 20 second process. Everything else kind of depends. So if you’re somebody who is with a Mediavine and you have Google analytics and search console, and you do have Facebook and Instagram and YouTube and Slick Stream, it might take you, I don’t know, five to 10 minutes to get set up, but if you’re somebody who just has WordPress and maybe Google analytics or maybe you do search console as well, it might take you a minute or two to get set up, but that’s about. It won’t take anybody more than 10 minutes to get everything set up and import it.

Megan:

When is this available? Because everyone’s probably like, Justin, how do I get this? Because it sounds great. I know you are going into beta testing, I believe. So tell us when this will be available for the masses.

Justin:

So time is funny, right? It feels like I’ve been working on Other Board for like six years, but I was looking back at internal slack notes and our project management system that we’ve been using with it. Other Board wasn’t even an idea until December 19th of last year. Other Board as Other Board. Of course, these problems and pain points have been percolating for years. But Other Board as a concept has really just been the last six months. So we’ve been really heavy in full-time development since about February. We’re looking to launch beta by the end of June. Then we have a group of about 50 to 60 beta testers who have already signed up. I would say we have room for some more.

So if anybody’s listening and wants to get in that beta testing group, you can go to Other Board.com and sign up for the wait list. We’ll send you an email saying, Hey just reply back, saying you want to be in beta. We’d love more beta testers because more eyes find more bugs. So anybody listening wants to do that, that’d be great. We’re looking to launch beta really here at the end of next month, and then we’ll probably have two months or so of beta testing where again, just full-time focus on A, really making sure the experience and the usability and everything is really good. All the features work for everybody, the way that we intend for them to, and then also really listening to our users.

As I mentioned, that’s really just so important in that it has been from the beginning. Really listening to users about what matters most to them. So if there’s something that comes up in beta, that just feels like, Hey, we saw this clearly and this is what we want, but man, everybody’s asking for this. Then we might extend the beta a little bit to build out that feature just to launch really strongly with it. So right now the plan is anybody who’s in beta will have access to this by the end of June. Everybody else probably by the end of August or so is the plan right now. For folks who are beta testers, as a thank you for beta testing, they’ll get their first six months of Other Board for free. That’s the first six months after we launch officially.

Megan:

Awesome. What is the investment for people outside of beta testing?

Justin:

The investment isn’t based on the user. So you might have a team of six people or 10 people or two people or whatever. We don’t charge you per user. We charge per site. So for somebody with one site, the cost is $79 a month. For most of the folks that we’ve talked to when they hear everything it can do, they’ve said, wow, that’s amazing. There are a few people who have, man, I don’t know. I feel like that’s too much and we recognize maybe that’s not the best for everybody, but that’s the price point that we felt really good about for the value that we’re providing.

Megan:

Absolutely. Is there anything that we’ve missed that you feel like food bloggers should know about Other Board? I feel like we’ve covered a lot, but let me know if there’s anything to touch on yet.

Justin:

We’ve covered, we’ve covered so much. Yeah. I mean, the intention and my heart behind Other Board is really working day in, day out with so many folks who have built really amazing businesses over the last 10 years or so, is that I want to bring some margin back into people’s lives. So if we can help them manage their teams and manage their content and manage their businesses better, more productively, just giving them more time in the day for the things that matter most to them. That’s what Other Board is really all about. I would just continue to harp on that user centricity. That’s our intention with everything. We’re not venture backed. We don’t have a bunch of investors we’re answering to. Our customers are our investors. We take everybody’s feedback really seriously. So I’m excited to see how people respond to it and how helpful it is for folks.

Megan:

Well, as someone who talks to food bloggers a lot, I can tell you that time management and just that feeling of never having enough time to get all of our work done, that is a huge pain point for us. So I feel like you’re addressing that. You are providing a platform that gives time back to food bloggers and that’s super valuable.

Justin:

Awesome. That’s the plan.

Megan:

Well, I love it, Justin. I’m super excited for you and I love that you saw this need, this pain point and you just decided to dig in. I mean, six months ago. Oh my goodness. It’s crazy that you guys did this so quickly, but it is a huge need and I can see this being wildly successful. So just wishing you all of the good thoughts, luck, everything. I think this is going to be great and it’s going to help food bloggers as well. So win-win all around.

Justin:

Awesome. I’m so glad to hear that. I’m so happy.

Megan:

Yes. Well thank you for being here today. I like to ask all my guests before they go, if they have either a favorite quote or words of inspiration to share.

Justin:

Oh cool. I do have a favorite quote. One of my favorite authors is an old dead guy named GK Chesterton. He is an old philosopher and theologian kind of guy. He said this in 1922, he said, “I believe what really happens in history is this. The old man is always wrong. The young people are always wrong about what is wrong with him. The practical form takes is this; that while the old man may stand by some stupid custom, the young man always attacks it with some theory that turns out to be equally stupid.” I appreciate that quote, because it just keeps us all pretty humble, which is always good.

Megan:

Gosh, I love that. It gives you so much to think about because everyone thinks they’re right. You can look at any generation and say, oh, they’re being so stubborn, but really? There’s such truth in that. I love it. Thanks for that perspective.

Justin:

Yeah, of course.

Megan:

Well, thanks again, Justin, we’re going to put together a show notes page for you. You can find that at eatblogtalk.com/otherboard. Justin, tell everyone where they can find you online. Are you on Instagram, just on your website? Where can they go?

Justin:

Yeah, you can follow me on Instagram at JustinSaIntons my username. Let’s see. On Twitter, you can hit me up at otherboardapp on Twitter. Lots of places to find me. But truly if you go to otherboard.com and you sign up for the wait list, you’ll get a real human response from me if you send me an email. So I’d love to connect with you. I’d love to hear from you.

Megan:

Awesome. Well, thank you again, Justin for being here and thank you for listening today, food bloggers. I will see you next time.

Outro:

We’re glad you could join us on this episode of Eat Blog Talk. For more resources based on today’s discussion, as well as show notes and an opportunity to be on a future episode of the show, be sure to head to eatblogtalk.com. If you feel that hunger for information, we’ll be here to feed you on Eat Blog Talk.


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Megan
Megan

Megan started her food blog Pip and Ebby in 2010 and food blogging has been her full-time career since 2013. Her passion for blogging has grown into an intense desire to help fellow food bloggers find the information, insight, and community they need in order to find success.

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