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Episode 181: Wisdom From Mature Bloggers with Cathy Brak

In episode 181, we talk with Cathy Brak, a blogger who started sharing her food blog with the world later in life and explains how life experience gives you authority to share as a new blogger today.

We cover information about how SEO and keyword research are so important, no matter what stage of blogging you are in and how balance is important to achieve as you navigate prioritizing personal time and professional success.

Listen on the player below or on iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast player. Or scroll down to read a full transcript.


Guest Details

Connect with Cathy’s Gluten Free
Website | Instagram

Bio
Cathy’s been blogging for three years at Cathy’s Gluten Free. When she took an early retirement from her teaching job, she had to take some time to sort out health issues. Later she learned that she needed to eat gluten free, so she spent some time learning how to do that and how to cook and bake differently than in the past. This is when Cathy discovered gluten free blogs which were very helpful to her. Eventually, she decided to begin her own. Cathy’s first blog wasn’t primarily a food blog, but she soon realized that she needed to narrow down, and food is what she chose to focus on.

Takeaways

  • Mature bloggers bring life experience to their audience and know they don’t need to waste time working towards something that isn’t truly attainable or desirable to them (i.e. not everyone wants to be a YouTube star).
  • Bloggers who start later in life probably have a best friend, spouse or son in law to help them with some of the set up/skills needed for blogging and should use that to their advantage.
  • Getting a site audit can be helpful knowing what to tackle and when.
  • It can be helpful if you start blogging later in life because then you don’t have the pressure of needing to make money right away.
  • Make a goal and then work to organize your time to accomplish it – if you are aiming for 1 post a week, you have to consider preparing the recipe, photography, writing the post and SEO. Once you are faster at doing each of those elements, you can increase how many posts you can do.
  • When selecting additional projects for your business such as ebooks or creating courses, consider what elements there are, then determine how much you can devote to completing the extra project that might take you away from regular blog content.
  • Take advantage of free groups and podcasts to get useful advice like EBT, Food Blogger Pro or Facebook groups to help build your business.
  • Choose where to place your focus and don’t try to do it all. You can have a presence on social media but not spend all your time there when the impact it can have will be minimal compared to adding quality content.

Resources Mentioned

KeySearch – Keyword research made easy

Keywords Everywhere – keyword research on the go

Starting A Blog Mid-Life?

Mary at Restless Chipotle can encourage your journey in episode 134 so you do it with grace and purpose.

Transcript

Click for full text.

Intro:

Welcome to Eat Blog Talk, where food bloggers come to get their fill of the latest tips, tricks, and insights into the world of food blogging. If you feel that hunger for information, we’ll provide you with the tools you need to add value to your blog. And we’ll also ensure you’re taking care of yourself, because food blogging is a demanding job. Now please welcome your host, Megan Porta.

Megan Porta:

Are you a motivated food blogger, striving to meet financial or freedom goals? If so, then the Eat Blog Talk Membership is for you. Take a journey with like-minded peers that will bring you past the overwhelm and straight into the arms of clarity. You will have direct access to guest experts, delivering massive amounts of value into your business. You will have the opportunity to participate in monthly strategy calls, focusing on different aspects of food blogging. Most importantly, you will be part of a tight knit supportive and encouraging family filled with people just like you. Visit eatblogtalk.com for more information. The rest of us can not wait to see you inside.

What’s up food bloggers. Welcome to Eat Blog Talk. This podcast is for you, food bloggers, wanting a clear path to achieving your goals. I am so thrilled to get some time with Cathy Brak today from cathysglutenfree.com.

We are going to have a chat about the advantages of starting a blog later in life. Cathy has been blogging for three years at Cathy’s Gluten Free. When she took an early retirement from her teaching job, she had to take some time to sort out health issues. Later she learned that she needed to eat gluten free, so she spent some time learning how to do that and how to cook and bake differently than in the past. Cathy then discovered gluten free blogs, which were very helpful for her. Eventually she decided to begin her own. Cathy’s first blog was not primarily a food blog, but she soon realized that she needed to narrow down and food is what she chose to focus on. Cathy, thank you so much for being here. I’m so excited to chat about this topic today, but first we want to hear your fun fact.

Cathy Brak:

Hey, I’m very excited to be here. I’ve been a regular listener and it’s fun to finally get to chat with you. My fun fact, not so fun these days, but I think it’s interesting that my husband and I were both born and raised in Canada and raised our kids in Canada, but now all of our three kids and our grandkids all live in the States.

Megan:

Ooh.

Cathy:

Yeah.

Megan:

Is that a sad thing or do you like to visit

Cathy:

We love to visit. So normally it’s a great thing. We travel down in our RV and spend some time parked in each other driveways and that sort of thing. This last year was a long one because we didn’t see them since last Christmas, but we actually did take a trip down this Christmas and we did see them. So we have to quarantine when we get back to Canada and we’re actually in our last day of quarantine now.

Megan:

Okay. So where in the States do your kids live?

Cathy:

They’re in Pennsylvania, Missouri and Colorado.

Megan:

Oh my gosh. So spread all over.

Cathy:

They are.

Megan:

Colorado is one of my favorites. It’s so beautiful and peaceful there for me. I love it. Well, I did notice about you the RV thing, because we’ve talked before about having RVs and traveling because we have an RV as well and travel in the summer. So that’s really cool. So I’m excited to talk about starting a blog later in life. This topic is near and dear to my heart. You might know this, but there are quite a few women over the age of 40 and 50 and 60 who are starting to dig into blogging and who maybe have been doing it for awhile, who were also part of the Eat Blog Talk community, which I think is so cool. So I think this episode is going to be really valuable for them in particular. We have some notes here I would just love to run through. You have such great thoughts about this. So let’s start by talking through some of the skills people who begin blogging quote later in life. We should probably define that, it makes that sound like you’re 80 or 90 or a hundred.

Cathy:

But I am a grandma.

Megan:

Honestly I think, mature bloggers or I don’t want to say older bloggers because I don’t want to put that term there. But later in life, I would say if you’re 40 or 50 or 60 or above, that would probably fall into that category because there are so many twenties and thirties bloggers out there. So we’ll just go with that later in life.

Cathy:

We’re experienced in life.

Megan:

Mature. So what do those people, the later in life experienced mature bloggers, bring to the table?

Cathy:

Well, I think the experience is what we bring. Even though we may not know a lot about the blogging world, the online world, we know about people and we’ve figured out a few things and it’s different for each person, I’m sure. I realized that I had learned how to set goals and how to manage my time and how to focus on what I needed to focus on. Once I learned within the food blogging world, what those things are, then I can do it. So people come with all sorts of different experiences. Some people already know how to take good photographs. Some people are professional chefs. Some people have been in web design or their spouse is a web designer. When I started, it seemed like everybody had had someone like that in their life, but that’s not necessarily true. Actually my son-in-law helped me, he’s a web designer and he was able to help me just in the beginning stages of setting up my blog or I probably could never have done it. I was expressing to him at the beginning how little I knew and how overwhelming all this was, but he said, but you know how to cook. Your food is good. So that was encouraging.

Megan:

Just knowing those life skills and honing in on the things that you know really well and that you’ve developed over years and decades is going to make you a better food blogger. Even if you don’t know how to run the tech side of things, there’s always someone to do that for you. So I think that’s a really good viewpoint. What do you like, do you like cooking? Is that why you’re here? Then yeah. Focus on that and don’t get distracted by the other things. Do you get help from your son-in-law, who helps you a little bit?

Cathy:

He did at the beginning. Not so much now because his expertise isn’t in food blogging, it’s in different directions, but he certainly was a good help getting me started.

Megan:

Are there parts of food blogging that you just really don’t desire, that you outsource? Or how do you take care of those parts?

Cathy:

I got an audit from Casey Markee and that was really helpful. So I know where to focus my efforts now, but no, I don’t get much other help really at all. It’s something I would certainly like to get help with the tech side of things more. I also like a challenge and I like to learn how to do that stuff, but I’ve found we don’t have time to learn everything we need to do.

Megan:

Yeah, that’s so true. So I see so many people, so many bloggers digging into blogging and just completely immersing themselves in growing super fast. I’m sure you’ve seen these bloggers too. That just goes from zero to a million in a few months or a year or two. What are your thoughts on that? Because other bloggers, I feel like maybe the older ones, see, there, I said it. Not older, the bloggers who are starting later in life, don’t necessarily go so fast. What do you think about that?

Cathy:

Well, in my case, I mean, I would just have had no idea how to build it quickly. I just knew so little about the blogging world. I think it’s really nice when we’re often in a position where we’re a little more comfortable financially and don’t have the pressure of needing to make money right away. I felt so confused and overwhelmed by everything and all the courses and all the different things that I just had to flounder a little bit. I don’t think that was wasted time. I had to try things, had to try making all sorts of different recipes. In fact, my first blog wasn’t even a food blog. It was more lifestyle and about a property we have, that we’re developing. I thought I’ll just fill in with some gluten-free recipes. I thought, I don’t want to spend all that time and work actually developing new baked gluten free recipes. As it’s turned out, that’s the thing I’m loving. I found that the food blogging was a little easier to focus and I promote and find an audience for. It’s not the direction I thought I would go at all.

Megan:

Isn’t that funny how that works. You start thinking one thing and then it completely goes a different direction, but I liked your point about there not being pressure. If you’re 40 plus, there’s typically not a financial pressure like there might be when you’re in your twenties or just getting started. Maybe you have a family full of young kids and you’re trying to support them. That produces pressure. So taking the pressure off also takes the restraints on time, you can go at your own pace. You don’t feel like you have to go 90 miles an hour. That’s helpful I think because you can focus on the right things and not get distracted and try to do everything. I think this was one of our points later, but maybe I’ll just talk about that now. How do you do that? How do you prioritize your projects and focus?

Cathy:

That audit with Casey was a big help there. So I think as a newer blogger, we need to focus on making quality content. Maybe not so much on growing social media channels, depending on what our goals are. So good recipes, good photos, be careful with the writing, proofread, make sure it’s well done. Once I learned how to do a blog post and got a layout, a template to follow, I just felt freer to just charge ahead and focus on doing that. Now I’m learning more about SEO and really thinking about what recipes I’m going to be writing. So that’s what I’m focusing on. I think first I had to feel comfortable with my photos, which is still a work in progress, but they’re coming and I had to feel comfortable with how to write a recipe post. Now I feel like I’m focusing on what I should be writing them about.

Megan:

Those are like the pillars of food blogging. So quality, everything you do needs to be quality from the recipes to the photos, to the writing, to the way you present your blog. I mean, it all needs to be quality in my opinion. I know some people would disagree with that, but I so strongly think that if you want to be successful, you’ve got to have good photos. If you don’t that’s okay, but just always work on it and keep practicing. What are your thoughts about projects? How do you prioritize your projects and how do you focus on one versus the other? Do you go quarterly? Do you do this type of project? How do you go about that?

Cathy:

I guess my main framework is that I always want to have at least one blog post a week. So I’m focused on that primarily, but that’s several blog posts sort of overlapping. Maybe in the kitchen in the evening, I’m experimenting with some recipes, something that’s going to become a recipe down the road and I’m taking notes. Then there’ll be a day when I’ll shoot photos and a day when I’ll write, so I’m always focused on getting at least that one out a week. Then once I’ve got that on schedule or ahead of schedule, then I’m squeezing in another one. So that I’m at least one ahead, because again, we like to go away and I like to have the photos done, even though I could finish the writing when I’m traveling, I want to have most of the work done. So I would squeeze that in. Then now, because I want to focus on SEO, I’ve set aside a couple of days, one last week and one this week to just really dig into that and get lots of ideas and do some research. Does that answer your question?

Megan:

Yeah, it does. So basically you have a baseline, the minimum amount of projects or posts that you want to put into your business, and then you just build from there if you have time, what about extra projects? Do you do any eBooks? Do you dabble in anything like that?

Cathy:

Oh yes. Yes. I have an ebook. I’ve got the recipes done. The photos are done. My dear son-in-law is helping me with the layout of that right now. So it’s really close. It’s almost there. That was very time-consuming. I didn’t really get a second blog post written a week while I was developing those recipes.

Megan:

Yeah. It’s hard to prioritize those other projects. Do you find that too, because you want to focus on the quality of your blog content. So it’s hard to justify putting your time and love and energy into something else. That’s a struggle for me.

Cathy:

Yeah. The funny thing is I thought, and this started at least two years ago. I think the idea for this cookbook at first, it’ll just be an e-cookbook. Although I’m open to doing a print one next. Baby steps, because again, it’s all new and overwhelming and I can only do one thing at a time. But the recipes are done and I’m happy with them. I thought it’d be something that I just get out a quick little ebook so I can make some money before the blog was built to where it was making money. But oh my goodness, that took so long and, and was so much work that I don’t know. I mean, I’ve grown the blog more by now too.

Megan:

It all can be so overwhelming, especially when you heap projects on top of each other and in your mind you think, Oh, this will be fine. I can just crank that out. No problem. But it does not always work like that. I am notorious for that thinking, I can do it all, but we can’t, nobody can.

Cathy:

We cannot. It’s one of those lessons, yes, that I have to learn.

Megan:

So you mentioned working with Casey and digging into your SEO and keyword research a little bit more, and that is such a big focus for so many bloggers right now because we’re finding that it’s super important. A lot of us ignored it for a long time before we realized, oh we need to do this.

Cathy:

That’s what I’m hearing.

Megan:

I will not get into my story. I talk about it all the time, but it’s very overwhelming, but it’s necessary. So what is your advice for bloggers who are over the age of 40, who are really overwhelmed by this part of it? Because I can see where that could totally be the case for so many people. What’s your advice for them?

Cathy:

Again, Casey’s recommendation. I signed up for key search and they’ve got some little tutorials. It really didn’t take long to go through them. It’s pretty cool. You have some parameters, based on your blog and what range of searches you should be focusing within and also a number for the keyword difficulty for your niche, it takes your blog into account and everything. So you get some nice little numbers there and you just put in whatever words you can think of and filter it. It’s amazing what comes up.

Megan:

That’s so nice. And Key Search is not very expensive. It’s pretty affordable, correct?

Cathy:

That’s right. Yes. I also use Keywords Everywhere, but Key Search just has some more specifics.

Megan:

So keysearch.co and Keywords Everywhere are a great place to start. Do you think that if somebody who didn’t know anything about this, if they went into those two programs, would they have a really good handle on it? Is there anything else they would need to know or any other resources they would need to dig into?

Cathy:

Well, I’m no expert and I’m just starting with SEO, but I think it’s good. I think it’s a great place to start.

Megan:

Then as far as just getting general SEO advice and information, there are forums, there are groups, the Eat Blog Talk community. There are people in there who know quite a bit about SEO. So you can always go in there and ask questions. Then the F0od Bloggers Central group on Facebook. Casey, actually, I know he’s in there a lot answering questions for free. So there really is not a lack of information out there. It’s just a matter of knowing what you’re asking, because if you don’t know much about SEO, you really don’t know what to ask, but you just dig into it and I promise it’ll start making sense.

Cathy:

Yeah. There’s an area where having blogged a little bit first probably helps because I have an idea of what recipes resonate with my audience.

Megan:

That’s a big part of it that a lot of us don’t realize until it’s too late.T hen you’re like, Oh no, I have to go back.

Cathy:

You want them to be recipes that you enjoy making. This has to be fun. Doesn’t it?

Megan:

Absolutely. If your heart’s not in it and there’s no passion there, then honestly, why are you doing it? I see bloggers come into this space thinking that they just want to make money. There’s a lack of passion and those are the ones that don’t last. The ones that really stick with it and last forever are the ones that are so passionate about their niche or their food or their recipes, or maybe their family recipes or whatever it is that you make. Those are the people who really last in this game.

Cathy:

I can see why.

Megan:

So what else do you feel like 40 plus 50 plus women, men who come in to blogging need to know before they get started or maybe they’re just getting started. What other advice do you have for them?

Cathy:

Oh, join the Eat Blog Talk forum. Food Blogger Pro membership was helpful for me getting started too. There’s so much noise out there and it’s just hard to know what to focus on. That’s what you’re asking me. Just back to focus on the recipes. Have a presence on social media, for sure. Facebook and Instagram and I tweet out my new recipes. That’s about it for Twitter for me.

Megan:

So you recommend having an account, but not necessarily focusing on it if it’s not a priority, I don’t know, in a given quarter or a stretch of time. I love that advice right there, because it’s overwhelming getting into it. Pretty soon you realize that, Oh, this isn’t just a blog. This is also Instagram. This is also Facebook and this is also Pinterest and now SEO. It can be so overwhelming and you can so easily feel like you’ve got to do all of it, but I do not agree with that. Open an Instagram account, grab your name. Yes.

Cathy:

I think there’s a good community of food bloggers on Instagram. So that’s how I see it mostly at this point for myself is it’s a communication tool. I should also say that the whole just writing up a blog post with the photos and the steps in the recipe and everything seemed so overwhelming at first. But now as I’m getting into a pattern, that’s becoming a lot faster too. So that gets easier with time.

Megan:

Yeah. And that’s for anyone. When you first start, you think whoa, this took me nine hours just to write a blog post. It is not always like that.

Cathy:

Right. Then I could see it being easier to post twice a week, which I really would like to do, because I think then you just grow faster.

Megan:

That is true, the more content. Unless you’re like me and you have a bunch of garbage content lying underneath your good content, then it’s probably not the case, but I am not the typical blogging story I don’t think. Let’s talk about priorities a little bit more. I know we touched on this a little bit, but I think so often people think that bloggers who are over those ages of 40, 50, 60, just have all the time in the world. There’s that perception like, Oh, you have all the time in the world to blog, but you actually have a life. You mentioned, you like to travel and you guys take your RV out. You have family, you have grandkids. There’s a lot to do in the last half of life. I can’t wait to slow down a little bit with my work and get to that point where I can actually go explore the world a little bit more. So how much of your energy are you willing to hand over to blogging and how do you balance that?

Cathy:

Where I can, but within reason. Another twist that’s just been thrown into my life is my husband just retired over Christmas and that was totally unplanned. We thought he had another year to work. I thought I had another year to build my blog up and we started house plans. We’re going to be building a house. So that’s a move up a year as well. There’s a lot happening all of a sudden. We’re going to probably move out of our house, put our things in storage and move into our motorhome while we’re building. Lots of challenges.

Megan:

Lots to do. There’s not a lack of things to do.

Cathy:

There are certain things that are built into my schedule. At this stage of life, I don’t want to sacrifice time with family and friends, but on the other hand, I am strict about my blog schedule in a flexible way. Does that make sense?

Megan:

Yeah, I like that.

Cathy:

Making sure I at least get that one post out a week.

Megan:

Your baseline. You have something that you will not go below.

Cathy:

Yeah. Each week is different, which is wonderful. It doesn’t get boring and there are different things to do, a little less these days. We’re pretty much locked down here in Ontario, Canada. I think that’s where maturity and experience plays a part in balancing that I don’t feel like I’m neglecting friends and family, but I am getting my blog work done too.

Megan:

It’s so different with each age, because right now I feel guilty when I’m infringing on my family time. I don’t do that often. I am really, really strict about that to an extreme, but there are times when I have to work on a weekend and just this past weekend, I had a project that came up and I had to work on it. So I was downstairs working and I feel guilty because my boys still like me and they’re not little, little anymore, but they’re young. I want to be with them. I know that someday in the near future, they’re going to be not interested in mom anymore. So no matter what stage of life you’re in, you’re always going to feel that pull I think, to spend time with people and spend time traveling or whatever it is you like to do. So you have to find a balance. I think that’s what it’s all about. No matter where you’re at, you’ve got to find that balance and protect your time.

Cathy:

Yes, exactly. Yes. I don’t spend time doing things I don’t want to do.

Megan:

There you go. That’s well said. You do the things you need to do, but you’re not doing things you don’t want to do. If it’s a project that needs to get done. Fine. Yes. Get it done. I like that. Balance is hard, isn’t it? It’s no matter what age you are, it’s just such a hard thing to figure out. But once you do, it took me so many years. Then I finally felt like it clicked overnight one night. I was like, Oh my gosh. And it’s easy. All I had to do was put a time limit on my work and seriously, it was as easy as that to be done working at five. Ghen you have all of this time for family and things changed drastically once I did that. What else do you have for us? So you talked a little bit about flexibility and liking the flexibility. I think that’s a huge allure of blogging. What else do you have to say about that?

Cathy:

One thing that’s maybe more unique to an experienced blogger is well, to put it bluntly, we don’t have as much time left. We’re not someone in our twenties looking forward to an unlimited range of possibilities for life and the huge business we might grow. I’m a little narrower in my focus there, I think. I have no intention of starting a podcast or of having a big YouTube channel. I do have some recipes on there just as a way to show people, just where to put my videos is basically what that is. I don’t think I’ll be starting a big course or anything like that other than maybe I could see doing cooking classes or something just on a smaller level. I’m focusing on growing my blog for ad income and some affiliate income and the ebook, and that’s sort of what I’m looking at. Pat Flynn said once to just focus on what you need right now. That’s something I’ve learned to do because again, when I started blogging, there were all these things coming at me and all these ways bloggers can make money, which is wonderful, but you need to pick the ones that are right for you. That has helped me to just be a little clear about those things, I think, and not feel bad that I won’t be a famous YouTuber or whatever.

Megan:

Absolutely. It is easy to get caught up in that because you see the YouTubers who are just wildly successful and there’s someone I had on the podcast last summer who makes eBooks that’s pretty much all she does to support her blog in addition to ad revenue. She makes so much money. I see that and think maybe I should do that. But then I see someone else making money doing affiliate marketing. So I think I should do that. It’s like that shiny object syndrome. You just kind of sit still for a minute and see what works for you. What is working for you and focus on just one or two things, like you’re doing Cathy. I think that’s actually super smart because it’s exhausting wanting to do all of the things.

Cathy:

And again, they need to be the things you enjoy doing. I’d probably be totally stressed out if I was in front of the camera all the time.

Megan:

It takes a lot of energy and it’s depleting, I imagine doing that a lot.

Cathy:

I think it charges some people up, it’s different personalities.

Megan:

I have two questions to ask you. This is not in our notes. So I’m throwing this on you. Give us your best advice for younger bloggers, meaning like under the age of 40, maybe just starting out or they’ve been blogging for just a little while.

Cathy:

Oh my goodness. Listen to me. I’m going to say again, I’m surprising myself. Start SEO sooner. Isn’t that weird? Because till I did, I wouldn’t have said that obviously. I think because SEO is easier than I thought it would be. Maybe that’s why, but still throw some recipes out, `favorite recipes to see what does well. Write your recipes simply and clearly for beginner cooks, learn to take good photographs. Don’t try to develop a recipe and photograph at all at the same time. You have to be patient. I have done some video, but I sort of put that on the back burner. Actually, that’s what went on the back burner when I started the ebook. Now I’m just focusing on SEO and building up my blog and then I plan to come back and add videos to the recipes that are doing well.

Megan:

That’s a good strategy.

Cathy:

Not just every single one.

Megan:

That is a really good strategy because that can be an extremely overwhelming piece of it. Okay. Would your advice for mature bloggers 40 and over be different? And if so, what would it be?

Cathy:

Just lean into the strengths that you already have. Those are some things you’re not going to have to learn all over again.

Megan:

Yeah. That’s great advice. Because you’re here for a reason you’re here because you do have strengths in a certain area relating to food blogging. You wouldn’t enter food blogging, not liking a part of it. That would kind of be useless, pointless, so lean into it. What sets you apart? What makes you better? What makes you light up? All of those things? Because you can really find people to support you. Like you have your son-in-law who helped you set up your site. There are so many people. I mean, whatever your struggle is, do you agree with this? That there’s someone out there to help you, so don’t let that hang you up.

Cathy:

That’s true. That’s true. It might be hard to find that person at first. I think that was an issue I had because there’s again, so much noise and I just didn’t know who to trust. How did I know that what they were doing was right. That’s a question we need to ask.

Megan:

That’s a great question. How do you cut through the noise? How did you figure out that Casey was the one to hire? Or how did you figure out where to go for collaborations with peers?

Cathy:

I watched people for a while and I heard a lot of people recommend Casey, so that’s why I finally took the plunge and hired him. I had been watching and listening for a long time and watched anything that he did or listened to anything. I just listened to the interview he did with you just recently.

Megan:

That was a good one. He’s doing a webinar today, by the way, four o’clock central standard time. There are people in the field who come with a reputation and people know them for being really good and having all kinds of knowledge. These people like Casey dig into their niches so far and deep. So they really do know what they’re talking about. So it’s a matter of finding those people and then meeting them where they are, where they deliver for free, because so many people deliver free value on Eat Blog Talk forum. There’s so much free value there. In this podcast. Oh my gosh. You could start a blog just from listening to the episodes in this podcast and it’s all free and there’s free stuff everywhere. There’s so much noise too. So it’s a matter of learning where you can go, who you can trust and who you should shut out and what noise you shouldn’t listen to. That’s probably the hardest part, right?

Cathy:

The podcast has been very helpful that way for me, introduced me to other people and, and you get to know people by listening to them.

Megan:

That is true. You touched on this a little bit earlier, but Instagram you said is a platform for connecting with people. So don’t discount Instagram, but don’t necessarily put all your eggs there. Don’t yearn for traffic from there because it’s probably not going to happen especially right away. But it is such a great platform for getting to know your peers. I got to know so many people through Instagram and I don’t know that I would have probably gotten to know them any other way. So it’s valuable for that. So, Cathy, this has been fun. I think we’ve provided some great information for people well of any age really, but if somebody is 40 plus getting into blogging, I think this episode will give them just a grasp on what to focus on how to move forward, how to prioritize and all of that. Is there anything you would like to say on the topic before we start saying goodbye?

Cathy:

I welcome other food bloggers to reach out to me and introduce themselves. Let me know if they heard me here and we can get to know each other too. I’m offering a list of wholesome foods, snack pairings, that if your listeners would be interested, it’ll be at cathysglutenfree.com/eatblogtalk. It’s whole foods, fruits and vegetables, nuts, just simple things like that that you’re probably snacking on already, but I’ve done pairings. So if you’re bored with one thing, it’s the two things that go well together. It’s a little chart, that’s all photographed. Just some interesting combinations you might not have thought of before. So that’s something that I have for your listeners.

Megan:

Awesome. I’m going to go check that out. Thank you for doing that. That’s amazing. Well, thank you for being here, Cathy. This was valuable. I’m so grateful that we got some time together. Do you have a favorite quote or words of inspiration to share with us?

Cathy:

Yes. This relates to something we were talking about earlier. So years ago in another lifetime, I was a sales director with a cosmetic company and Mary Kay Ash always told us to put God first, family second and career third. That has always served me well.

Megan:

Oh, I love that. Great way to end great words to say goodbye on, thank you for sharing that. So Cathy mentioned her resource that you can go grab and we’ll put that link in her show notes, as well as some other things we’ve talked about today. You can also access the full transcript for this episode in her show notes as well. You can find that at eatblogtalk.com/cathybrak. Cathy is spelled with a C and Brak is B R A K. And you kind of covered this, but reiterate where we can all find you online Cathy

Cathy:

Cathysglutenfree.com, no apostrophe.

Megan:

What is your Instagram handle?

Cathy:

It’s at @Cathysglutenfree.

Megan:

Where should people reach out if they want to just connect with you and chat with you about anything, where can they best find you at?

Cathy:

Either my contact form on my website or Instagram. An Instagram message would be great.

Megan:

Awesome. Well, thanks again so much for being here, Cathy. It was super fun to talk to you and thank you for listening today, food bloggers. I will see you next time.

Outro:

We’re glad you could join us on this episode of Eat Blog Talk. For more resources based on today’s discussion, as well as show notes and an opportunity to be on a future episode of the show, be sure to head to eatblogtalk.com. If you feel that hunger for information, we’ll be here to feed you on Eat Blog Talk.


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Questions or comments on this episode?

Head over to the Eat Blog Talk forum post about episode #181 to leave any questions or comments. We’d love to hear from you!

Megan
Megan

Megan started her food blog Pip and Ebby in 2010 and food blogging has been her full-time career since 2013. Her passion for blogging has grown into an intense desire to help fellow food bloggers find the information, insight, and community they need in order to find success.

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